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Symposium Description

Program content has been organized into five topics, or symposia and will be presented over the course of the conference on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday.  In order to plan your viewing schedule, topics and times for each symposia are listed here.  Please select the title of the symposium for more details of the presentations included in each time slot.

All times listed on are Eastern Time.

 

Symposium 1

Granular Materials in Space Exploration

Co-Chairs: Philip Metzger, Ph.D., University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL; and Juan AguiPh.D., NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH

This symposium will focus on the science and engineering of granular materials in space exploration. When we visit a planetary body, we land on granular materials, drive on them, dig in them, extract resources from them, build with them, and study them for science. Because granular materials can rearrange on a mesoscopic scale, their emergent behaviors are difficult to predict and are the subject of intensive research by physicists, engineers, geologists, and other disciplines. Research includes experiments, computer modeling, and collection of data from planetary missions. Technologies are being developed to study granular materials on the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and beyond. Sessions in this symposium will focus on lunar regolith and dust, asteroid regolith, soil mechanics, granular flow, rocket exhaust interactions with regolith, and anything that requires or supports our understanding of granular materials in space.

Wednesday, April 21 | 1:20 - 2:50 pm | WA

Chairs:  Phil Metzger and Juan Agui

Wednesday, April 21 | 3:00 - 4:30 pm | WB

Chairs:  Addie Dove and Otis Wilson

Thursday, April 22 | 12:40 - 2:10 pm | TA

Chairs:  Heather Oravec and Timothy Newsom

Thursday, April 22 | 2:20 - 3:50 pm | TB

Chairs:  Margaret Proctor and Hriday Patel

 

Symposium 2

Exploration and Utilization of Extra-Terrestrial Bodies

Co-Chairs: Robert P. Mueller, NASA Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, FL; and Kris Zacny, Ph.D., Honeybee Robotics, Pasadena, CA

This topic will focus on methodologies, techniques, instruments, concepts, missions and system level designs associated with exploration and utilization of Solar System bodies, with emphasis on the Moon, Mars, Ocean Worlds, and Asteroids. The topic covers both robotic and human exploration. Many of the various types of civil, geological, mining, chemical and materials engineering fields are needed to sustain space exploration and space commercialization. The topic also covers legal and ethical aspects of space exploration and space mining.

Standard practices will have to be adapted, and new practices will have to be developed, to be able to rely on the natural resources of near-Earth asteroids, the Moon, and Mars to sustain human and robotic activities in space. Engineering systems and economics concepts, as well as mechanical, robotic, and structural engineering solutions are needed as well. While there is always room for robust and innovative new concepts, the testing, refining, and more testing of previously proposed concepts are especially sought.

Wednesday, April 21 | 1:20 - 2:50 pm | WA

Chairs:  Robert Mueller and Robert Moses

Wednesday, April 21 | 3:00 - 4:30 pm | WB

Chairs:  Andrew Nick and Zach Mank

Thursday, April 22 | 12:40 - 2:10 pm | TA

Chairs:  Andrew Trunek and Kris Zacny

Thursday, April 22 | 2:20 - 3:50 pm | TB

Chairs:  Robert Mueller and Purushotham Tukkaraja

Thursday, April 22 | 4:00 - 5:30 pm | TC

Chairs:  Yosi Bar-Cohen and Steve Vance

Friday, April 23 | 11:50 - 1:20 pm | FA

Chairs:  Paul van Susant and Tony Colaprete

Friday, April 23 | 1:40 - 3:00 pm | FBi

Chairs:  Hunter Williams and Nathan Gelino

Friday, April 23 | 1:40 - 3:00 pm | FBii 

 

Symposium 3

Advanced Materials and Designs for Aerospace and Terrestrial Structures Under Extreme Environments

Co-Chairs: An Chen, Ph.D., Iowa State University, Ames, IA and Hongyu (Nick) Zhou, Ph.D., University of Alabama-Huntsville, Huntsville, AL

New techniques in experimental, computational, and analytical mechanics are expanding the understanding of the behavior of composite, smart, and other materials with applications to aerospace structures and other terrestrial structures under extreme environmental conditions. Exciting combinations of fundamental studies and practical applications by government and industry are expanding the design and analysis capabilities for aerospace structures as well as terrestrial structures to be used in extreme environments. Recent advances and studies on materials and structures as well as their design aspects in terrestrial aviation and space applications and related structures are particularly solicited.

Wednesday, April 21 | 1:20 - 2:50 pm | WA

Chair:  Justin Littell

Wednesday, April 21 | 3:00 - 4:30 pm | WB

Chair:  Justin Littell

Thursday, April 22 | 2:20 - 3:50 pm | TB

Chairs:  Chris Ferraro and Emanuela Del Gado

Thursday, April 22 | 4:00 - 5:30 pm | TC

Chairs:  Gregory Odegard and Chao Zhang

 

Symposium 4

Structures in Challenging Environments: Dynamics, Controls, Smart Structures, Health Monitoring, and Sensors

Co-Chairs: Wei Zhang, Ph.D., University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos, Ph.D., University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL; and Gangbing Song, Ph.D., University of Houston, Houston, TX

The technical areas of dynamics, controls, and evaluation and condition monitoring of engineering structures and systems, specially designed and built to operate in challenging environments on Earth and in space, are of extreme importance. Integration of sensors into structural and material systems enables more effective and precisely tuned performance, as well as remote evaluation and control of space and terrestrial structures systems. The design and analysis of structures in challenging environments on any planetary body need special care beyond current terrestrial practice. Space environments – on planetary surfaces or in orbit – expose systems to radiation, micro/reduced gravity, vacuum, debris/meteoroid impact, and temperature extremes. Overcoming these significant challenges is imperative to the success of any structure in space and in extreme and challenging environments on Earth. In addition, educators face challenges in using emerging technology to improve the education of the engineers of the future.

Wednesday, April 21 | 1:20 - 2:50 pm | WA

Chairs:  Bin Huang and Weijie Li

Wednesday, April 21 | 3:00 - 4:30 pm | WB

Chairs:  Chunyuan Zuo and Tianyong Jiang

Thursday, April 22 | 12:40 - 2:10 pm | TA

Chairs:  Gang Li and Guoxing Wang

Thursday, April 22 | 2:20 - 3:50 pm | TB

Chairs:  Dong-Ho Choi and Kai Wei

Thursday, April 22 | 4:00 - 5:30 pm | TC

Chairs:  Peng Zhang and Baoxin Qi

Friday, April 23 | 11:50 - 1:20 pm | FA

Chairs:  Shi Yan and Bo Wen

Friday, April 23 | 1:40 - 3:10 pm | FB

Chairs: Xin Nie and Wenwei Yang

 

Symposium 5

Space Engineering, Construction, and Architecture for Moon, Mars, and Beyond

Co-Chairs: Ramesh B. Malla, Ph.D., F. ASCE, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Melissa Sampson, Ph.D., Ball Aerospace, Boulder, CO; Alexander Jablonski, Ph.D., P.Eng, Canadian Space Agency, Ottawa, Canada; and Gerald (Jerry) B. Sanders, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX

There have been increased activities and interests in space activities, especially lunar and Martian exploration by the public and private sectors alike. Many national and international agencies and space industry are currently involved in the planned lunar missions. The recent United States Space Policy Directive 1 directs NASA to focus on lunar exploration with a new human return to the Moon and then manned missions to Mars. These efforts will involve both robotic and human missions. The recent landing of the Chinese lunar surface probe Chang’e-4 on the far side of the Moon has opened up a new chapter in lunar exploration with plans by several space actors for humans to follow in the late 2020’s.

As the world’s space community prepares to return to the Moon with humans, this time to stay, explore and then settle elsewhere in the Solar System on a long term basis, it is imperative that we continue to support the development of qualified engineering, construction and architecture concepts and guidance for these developments. On Earth, multiple new spaceports have been constructed with modernized methods and operations, providing new insights into enhanced operational efficiencies, This symposium deals with innovative concepts, methods, designs, research, development, and applications related to all aspects of human space exploration, architecture, engineering and construction, including facilities in orbit and on planetary surfaces such as the Moon, Mars, moons of Mars and asteroids, as well as terrestrial spaceports.

Wednesday, April 21 | 1:20 - 2:50 pm | WA

Chairs:  Ramesh B. Malla and Gerald (Jerry) B. Sanders

Wednesday, April 21 | 3:00 - 4:30 pm | WB

Chairs:  Alex Jablonski and Kin Man

Thursday, April 22 | 12:40 - 2:10 pm | TAi

Chairs:  Greg Muller and Ramesh B.Malla

Thursday, April 22 | 12:40 - 2:10 pm | TAii

Chair:  Valentina Sumini

Thursday, April 22 | 2:20 - 3:50 pm | TB

Chairs:  Amin Maghareh, Karen Marais, and Shirley Dyke

Thursday, April 22 | 4:00 - 5:30 pm | TCi

Chair:  Sudarshan Krishnan

Thursday, April 22 | 4:00 - 5:30 pm | TCii

Chairs:  Rob Mueller and James T. Barrett

Friday, April 23 | 11:50 - 1:20 pm | FAi

Chairs:  Robert Skelton and Ju Hon Park

Friday, April 23 | 11:50 - 1:20 pm | FAii

Chairs:  Nipesh Pradhananga and Mustafa Alsaleh

Friday, April 23 | 1:40 - 3:00 pm | FBi

Chairs:  Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos and Melissa Sampson

Friday, April 23 | 1:40 - 3:00 pm | FBii

Chair:  Seung Jae Lee

 

 

 

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